Art of Telling – Your Style

Your style is very important to your message. Below are four important styles to make your own.

  1. Eye Contact:  If you want to improve any presentation before a group, large or small, increase your eye contact. Pick out a person’s eye. If you want to maintain control of a conversation, maintain eye contact.
  2. Quick Mental Process:  Another style is the revelation, as you speak, of a quick mental process. As opposed to a stumbling style, a stuttering style, an incoherent style, a halting style, a slow style, or a disorganized style. 
  3. Phraseology:  Saying it clean and clear. Say it right to the point. Be precise. Use verbs more often in a sentence than nouns. Rely on verb phrases over noun phrases. People respond more affirmatively to verb phrases. You can vastly improve the structure of your presentation by emphasizing the verb phrases instead of the noun phrases. 
  4. Positive Posturing:  Use a positive posturing instead of a negative posturing. (Example of an employee telling a customer that “we don’t open until ten” when they could have said “we open at ten.” Always say it in a positive manner). 

Your Best Chance to Be Effective: 

Put the words ‘you’ and ‘your’ into your presentation as many times as you possibly can. Always turn your message towards the needs of your listener. 

  • “Now, let’s look at it from your perspective…”
  • “Here’s what this means to you…”
  • “Here are some of the things that you can do…”
  • “Here’s how you can profit from this…” 

In the next blog, we’ll go over Your Style, Part 2.

Gary believes that speaking skills are required and acquirable for today’s business professional. The purpose of the Art of Telling blog series is to enable readers to develop the communication and presentation skills that will serve them a lifetime. Click here to see more on Gary’s Art of Telling programs and seminars.

Gary Tomlinson
www.gary-tomlinson.com
(919) 847-6235

About Gary Tomlinson

Gary Tomlinson has been an entrepreneur and business owner for over 40 years. Today he is a leadership consultant and executive coach specializing in executive team alignment and organizational execution.
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